Paul and Denise Pouliot. He is the Sag8mo & THPO (speaker) and she is the Sag8moskwa (lady speaker and an artist), Cowasuck Band of the Pennacook and Abenaki People. Alton. Peter Randall photograph.

On Monday, July 11, at 6:30PM, join Cook Memorial Library and Chocorua Lake Conservancy outside behind the Cook Memorial Library in Tamworth for “Indigenous Conservation Today” with Paul W. Pouliot and Denise K. Pouliot, leaders of The Cowasuck Band of the Pennacook Abenaki People in Alton, New Hampshire. Paul and Denise will present an Indigenous historical narrative and contemporary response about being the continued “Care Takers” of N’dakinna, our homelands. The presentation will highlight ongoing social and environmental activism and how the attendees can be good stewards of Mother Earth by supporting these Indigenous community activities. Please register in advance at bit.ly/11July2022. In case of rain, the program will be held in an airy but covered location.

Presenters: 

Paul W. Pouliot has been the Sag8mo or Chief Speaker for the Cowasuck Band of the Pennacook Abenaki People and president of COWASS North America and the Abenaki Nation of Vermont since 1990. Paul is an Indigenous researcher, historian, lecturer, Department of Justice (BOP) federal Religious Advisor, and a founding member of the Indigenous New Hampshire Collaborative Collective (INHCC). He is also an Affiliate Faculty member of the UNH Native American and Indigenous Studies Minor, a recipient of the UNH Platinum Sustainability Award for community building in 2021, and a founding member of the New Hampshire Commission of Native American Affairs.

Denise K. Pouliot is the Sag8moskwa (Female Head Speaker) of the Cowasuck Band of the Pennacook Abenaki People and multimedia traditional artist and basket maker. She currently serves on the New Hampshire Commission on Native American Affairs, is a Department of Justice (BOP) federal Religious Advisor, and a founding member of the Indigenous New Hampshire Collaborative Collective (INHCC). Denise is also an Affiliate Faculty member of the UNH Native American and Indigenous Studies Minor, a recipient of the UNH Platinum Sustainability Award for community building in 2021, and is the treasurer for COWASS North America and the Abenaki Nation of Vermont.

This program is part of “Wabanaki History, Ecology & Experiences,” a series of programs exploring Indigenous history and experiences in what is now called northern New England, a collaboration between the Cook Memorial Library in Tamworth and the Chocorua Lake Conservancy, made possible through a generous grant from The Tamworth Foundation.

Indigenous Conservation Today – July 11
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